Pacific Coral Reefs

Latest update December 7, 2018 Started on January 1, 2018
sea

The Pacific Ocean is the largest water mass on Earth, covering about a third of the Earth's surface. The tropical Pacific Ocean is home to 25 percent of Earth's coral reefs and sustains the lives of Pacific peoples and many others around the world. More than 80 percent of Pacific islanders live in or near coastal areas and depend on coral reefs for their livelihood (Bell JD et al, 2009). I intend to create a better understanding of the health and status of coral reefs in the Pacific Region, through available technologies and information to make informed decisions on the future of these fragile and important ecosystems.

January 1, 2018
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Preparation

Agreement signed and Trident is on it's way!


I've put together a map of the Trident's route. In typical fashion, traveling to the Pacific and no less traveling within, can be long and expensive. Meetings to collaborate and to design projects are often necessary to build and strengthen relationships, which are important for environmental initiatives such as coral reef conservation.

To give an example using the Trident, if there was a direct flight from Oakland, California, USA to Apia, Samoa (Independent) the distance would be more or less 7,722 km* (4,798 mi), however, because it would not be economical for airlines to have direct flights, the TridentROV's route is more or less 13,801 km (8,576 mi), with a bit of digression to Auckland, New Zealand.

Some of the islands that are less traveled to such as Tuvalu, Wallis and Futuna or Pitcairn may have to wait hours or up to a week for the next flight or boat away to their next destination. It is quite the challenge to coordinate on a regional level, however, it is possible with enough funding and drive.

*calculation using travelmath.com

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Tuesday, November 20, 2018:


I have been informed that the Pacific Coral Reef Expedition has been awarded a Trident ROV from the S.E.E. (Sea Exploration Education) Initiative. I am beyond excited about this opportunity. The final condition to be a recipient of this prize, would be to gain 25 followers and today, we have 2 followers!

Tuesday, November 27, 2018:

Today there are 39 followers for the Pacific Coral Reef Expedition, which means that there will be a OpenROV Trident arriving in Samoa! Thank you so much to all the supporters of this project.

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Expedition Background

Coral reefs are largely understudied in the Pacific Region, whilst we know the indicators that represent coral health, we do not have enough information to make well informed conservation and management decisions.
Monitoring of coral reefs is strongly needed to have a better understanding of the type of effects we are having towards these precious ecosystems.

Image is an example of infrastructure developed over coral reef ecosystems, not unique to the Pacific Region. Pago-Pago International Airport, American Samoa.

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