Exploring a New White Shark Hotspot

Latest update November 29, 2018 Started on November 5, 2018
sea

We have discovered a new adult and subadult white shark hotspot in the Northeastern Pacific. By tagging individuals at this site we have discovered that this may be a sub-population of individuals that have not yet been studied or accounted for in previous estimates of white shark abundance.

November 5, 2018
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In The Field

We just wrapped up a tagging expedition to the Morro Bay region of California. We successfully satellite tagged 2 mature female white sharks, and hope to start receiving data soon. We were weathered out of our new Hotspot closer to Point Conception, but we've had tagged sharks from that spot visit this region near Morro Bay, so we thought we'd give it a shot!

Hey Michael, very cool the work you guys are doing! What kind of tags are you using? Looking forward for more updates!

I am interested in the types of tags and where to procure them also.
Hello! I'm so sorry I didn't see these comments before! But we are using Wildlife Computers SPOT tags. If you are thinking about starting a new study on a population of sharks that has not been studied before, I suggest you start with satellite popup tags instead, they provide detailed behavioral data and tracking. But they can't track a shark as accurately or as long as a SPOT tag. I started with popups, until I had tagged almost 100 white sharks. From that I had all the behavioral data I needed and then I moved forward with SPOT tags to get long term (multi-year) tracks. The difficult thing about SPOT tags is that you must capture the shark to tag it...not the case with popup tags.
Actually I would love to help you collect data and be trained
Nicolas, I wish I could take everyone who has made a similar request...but I would need a cruise ship to bring them all!
I understand! I could take you on my sailboat to any destinations in the Pacific. Been to Guadalupe island with it a few times. This is my expedition page to give you a better idea. https://openexplorer.nationalgeographic.com/expedition/paradigme2
Preparation

I've just returned from an expedition to Guadalupe Island, Mexico, in search of new individual Great White Sharks to add to our long term Photo-ID database. Check out this gorgeous mature female as she challenges me to a Mexican Standoff! This is the first time we have ever seen this individual, so we have added her to our catalog of sharks that visit this unique aggregation site. She has been named Suzie...we hope to get many records of her in the coming years.


Michael Domeier, Ph.D. Marine Conservation Science Institute

If you are looking for a cheap eco-friendly way to get to Guadalupe I could maybe support you with my sailboat.
Expedition Background

Our 1999 discovery of a massive adult White Shark aggregation site at Guadalupe Island, Mexico, rocked the shark world...now we think we've done it again! For the past decade we have been searching for any other unknown White Shark aggregations in the Northeastern Pacific, and after many false leads we think we have found what we've been looking for. Our new site, off the perilous coastal region near Pt. Conception, California, is proving to be another amazing site to consistently find adult and subadult White Sharks. But how does this aggregation fit in to the bigger picture? Are these sharks a new subgroup, or are they connected to either of the other two know aggregation sites at Guadalupe Island or the Farallone Islands? Early satellite tagging results from our first trips to this site suggests it might be largely separate from the other know aggregation sites, but we have had some connectivity between Pt. Conception and Guadalupe Island.


Our new California White Shark hotspot requires many expeditions in the coming years, so that we can begin to catalogue the individual sharks that visit this site and compare them to known individuals from Guadalupe Island and the Farallone Islands.

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